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LARGEST NET ZERO BUILDING IN US OPENS IN SAN DIEGO

LPL Financial La Jolla Commons Tower

LPL Financial LLC, the nation’s largest independent broker-dealer, an RIA custodian, and a wholly-owned subsidiary of LPL Financial Holdings Inc. (NASDAQ: LPLA), today celebrated the opening of its new San Diego headquarters, Tower II at La Jolla Commons, which is believed to be the largest net-zero energy commercial office building in the United States. In the weeks leading up to the office’s opening, more than 1,600 LPL Financial employees from seven office buildings in La Jolla moved to the La Jolla Commons facility.

The 13-story, 415,000-square-foot office tower demonstrates LPL Financial’s commitment to sustainability and social responsibility by incorporating among the most sophisticated available green technologies and health and wellness benefits for its employees in its office design. The tower utilizes three fuel cells to convert biogas into carbon-neutral electricity that will allow the building to achieve net-zero energy status. In order to monitor and manage the tower’s reduced energy consumption, energy meters are located throughout the building and all surplus power is pushed back to the grid through San Diego Gas & Electric. In addition, the tower is furnished with LED lights that feature automatic dimming capabilities based on the degree of available natural light, as well as occupancy sensors that turn lights off by detecting unoccupied offices.

Eighty-eight percent of the tower’s water consumption, nearly 2.5 million gallons annually, is recycled and used for irrigation and other building needs. Employee-focused sustainability programs encourage employees to recycle, compost and carpool. On-site charging stations for electric vehicles are also available for employee use at no cost.

Employee comfort and productivity was also a top priority for LPL Financial when designing the tower. With the help of ergonomists, customized furniture was designed to be easily adjusted with the touch of a button to accommodate various work styles. An under-floor air-distribution system with diffusers allows employees to control the flow of air into their individual workspaces. 

In addition to these sustainable and ergonomic features, Tower II at La Jolla Commons also offers a number of employee amenities, including an on-site health and fitness center with a certified wellness manager and a cafeteria featuring healthy food options.

“At LPL Financial, we are ambitiously working to be an employer of choice. As part of this commitment, we knew that our work environment needed to make an investment both in our employees and in the San Diego community. We saw designing this state-of-the-art building as core to enhancing the productivity, capabilities and well-being of our employees, which in turn allows us to better serve our clients,” said Mark Casady, chairman and CEO of LPL Financial. “By bringing employees together in this beautiful and inspiring workspace, we are ushering in a new era of collaboration and innovation that we believe will yield benefits not only for employees but also for the clients we serve.”

“Utilizing advances in technology to create efficiencies is at the heart of what LPL Financial provides for its advisors and institutional clients, and it is only fitting that we adopted the same approach in designing our new office tower. LPL Financial would like to thank Hines, J. P. Morgan Asset Management, Cresa, Gensler, Whiting Turner, WSP, San Diego Gas & Electric, GE Lighting, and Bloom Energy for their partnership as we worked together to create what we believe is the largest net-zero energy commercial office building in the country. Leveraging technology and advanced materials to minimize our impact on the environment, while creating a positive work environment for our employees, is consistent with our values as a firm and indicative of our strong commitment to being a socially responsible corporate citizen,” Casady added.

Hines Senior Managing Director Paul Twardowski said, “It was a pleasure collaborating with LPL Financial to push the sustainability envelope. Such collaboration has resulted in an extremely effective business solution that we are confident will bring significant value to LPL Financial investors, clients and employees for years to come.”

 

PRITZKER RECIPIENT HONORED

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Announcement

Shigeru Ban, a Tokyo-born, 56-year-old architect with offices in Tokyo, Paris and New York, is rare in the field of architecture. He designs elegant, innovative work for private clients, and uses the same inventive and resourceful design approach for his extensive humanitarian efforts. For twenty years Ban has traveled to sites of natural and man-made disasters around the world, to work with local citizens, volunteers and students, to design and construct simple, dignified, low-cost, recyclable shelters and community buildings for the disaster victims.

Reached at his Paris office, Shigeru Ban said, “Receiving this prize is a great honor, and with it, I must be careful. I must continue to listen to the people I work for, in my private residential commissions and in my disaster relief work. I see this prize as encouragement for me to keep doing what I am doing — not to change what I am doing, but to grow.“

In all parts of his practice, Ban finds a wide variety of design solutions, often based around structure, materials, view, natural ventilation and light, and a drive to make comfortable places for the people who use them. From private residences and corporate headquarters, to museums, concert halls and other civic buildings, Ban is known for the originality, economy, and ingeniousness of his works, which do not rely on today’s common high-tech solutions.

The Swiss media company Tamedia asked Ban to create pleasant spaces for their employees. 
He responded by designing a seven-story headquarters with the main structural system entirely 
in timber. The wooden beams interlock, requiring no metal joints.

For the Centre Pompidou-Metz, in France, Ban designed an airy, undulating latticework of wooden strips to form the roof, which covers the complex museum program underneath and creates an open and accessible public plaza.

To construct his disaster relief shelters, Ban often employs recyclable cardboard paper tubes for columns, walls and beams, as they are locally available; inexpensive; easy to transport, mount and dismantle; and they can be water- and fire-proofed, and recycled. He says that his Japanese upbringing helps account for his wish to waste no materials.

As a boy, Shigeru Ban observed traditional Japanese carpenters working at his parents’ house and to him their tools, the construction, and the smells of wood were magic. He would save cast aside pieces of wood and build small models with them. He wanted to become a carpenter. But at age eleven, his teacher asked the class to design a simple house and Ban’s was displayed in the school as the best. Since then, to be an architect was his dream.

Ban’s humanitarian work began in response to the 1994 conflict in Rwanda, which threw millions of people into tragic living conditions. Ban proposed paper-tube shelters to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and they hired him as a consultant. After the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, Japan, he again donated his time and talent. There, Ban developed the “Paper Log House,” for Vietnamese refugees in the area, with donated beer crates filled with sandbags for the foundation, he lined up the paper cardboard tubes vertically, to create the walls of the houses. Ban also designed “Paper Church,” as a community center of paper tubes for the victims of Kobe. It was later disassembled and sent to Taiwan, and reconstructed there, in 2008.

Ban works with local victims, students, and other volunteers to get these disaster relief projects built. In 1995, he founded a non-governmental organization (NGO) called VAN: Voluntary Architects’ Network. With VAN, following earthquakes, tsunami, hurricanes, and war, he has conducted this work in Japan, Turkey, India, Sri Lanka, China, Haiti, Italy, New Zealand, and currently, the Philippines.

Pritzker Prize jury chairman, The Lord Palumbo, said, “Shigeru Ban is a force of nature, which is entirely appropriate in the light of his voluntary work for the homeless and dispossessed in areas that have been devastated by natural disasters. But he also ticks the several boxes for qualification to the Architectural Pantheon — a profound knowledge of his subject with a particular emphasis on cutting-edge materials and technology; total curiosity and commitment; endless innovation; an infallible eye; an acute sensibility — to name but a few.”

The citation from the Pritzker Prize jury underscores Ban’s experimental approach to common 
materials such as paper tubes and shipping containers, his structural innovations, and creative use 
of unconventional materials such as bamboo, fabric, paper, and composites of recycled paper fiber 
and plastics.

The jury cites Naked House (2000) in Saitama, Japan, in which Ban clad the external walls in clear corrugated plastic and sections of white acrylic stretched internally across a timber frame. The layering of translucent panels evokes the glowing light of shoji screens. The client asked for no family member to be secluded, so the house consists of one unique large space, two-stories high, in which four personal rooms on casters can be moved about freely.

In Curtain Wall House (1995) in Tokyo, two-story-high white curtains along the perimeter of the house can be opened to let the outside flow in or closed to provide a cocoon-like setting. The 14-story Nicolas G. Hayek Center (2007) in Tokyo features tall glass shutters on the front and back facades that can be fully opened.

Ban used transportation containers as ready-made elements to construct the Nomadic Museum 
(New York, 2005; Santa Monica, California, 2006; Tokyo, 2007). His design for the Aspen Art Museum is slated to open in August 2014.

His architecture is often called “sustainable,” and environmentally friendly, but he says, “When I started working this way, almost thirty years ago, nobody was talking about the environment. But this way of working came naturally to me. I was always interested in low cost, local, reusable materials.”

Shigeru Ban served as a member of the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury from 2006 to 2009. He lectures and teaches at architecture schools around the world and is currently a professor at Kyoto University of Art and Design.

Ban attended architecture school first at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (then based in Santa Monica, California), and earned his bachelor’s degree in architecture from Cooper Union in New York City in 1984.

Shigeru Ban will be the seventh Japanese architect to become a Pritzker Laureate — the first six being the late Kenzo Tange in 1987, Fumihiko Maki in 1993, Tadao Ando in 1995, the team of Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa in 2010, and Toyo Ito in 2013.

The award ceremony will take place on June 13, 2014, at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The Pritzker Prize ceremony is held each year at a culturally or historically significant venue around the world. This marks the first time the ceremony will be in the Netherlands. The ceremony will be streamed live on PritzkerPrize.com, the website of the Pritzker Architecture Prize.

The distinguished jury that selected the 2014 Pritzker Laureate consists of its chairman, The Lord Palumbo, internationally known architectural patron of London, Chairman Emeritus of the Trustees, Serpentine Galleries, former Chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain, former Chairman of the Tate Gallery Foundation; and alphabetically: Alejandro Aravena, architect and Executive Director of Elemental in Santiago, Chile; Stephen Breyer, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Washington, D.C.; Yung Ho Chang, architect and educator, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China; Kristin Feireiss, architecture curator, writer, and editor, Berlin, Germany; Glenn Murcutt, architect and 2002 Pritzker Laureate, Sydney, Australia; Juhani Pallasmaa, architect, professor and author, Helsinki, Finland; and Ratan N. Tata, Chairman Emeritus of Tata Sons, the holding company of the Tata Group, Mumbai, India. Martha Thorne, Associate Dean for External relations, IE School of Architecture & Design, Madrid, Spain, is the Executive Director of the prize.

The Pritzker Architecture Prize was founded in 1979 by the late Jay A. Pritzker and his wife, Cindy. Its purpose is to honor annually a living architect whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture. The laureates receive a $100,000 grant and a bronze medallion.

In announcing this year’s laureate, Tom Pritzker said, “Shigeru Ban’s commitment to humanitarian causes through his disaster relief work is an example for all. Innovation is not limited by building type and compassion is not limited by budget. Shigeru has made our world a better place.”

ARCHITECT ROBERT SAWYER PUSHES FOR NEW INSPECTION PROVISIONS

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Westchester, CA 3/13/14 Older buildings routinely give notice about their state of health. Rarely do they collapse on their own without some kind of assistance. In the wake of the Harlem collapse of March 12th, 2014 which has claimed 8 lives so far, it is imperative for architects to inspect older buildings for a host of simple tell tale signs. Among these are uses other than for which the structure was designed. Changes in use can lead to building failure for several reasons including: overloading of PME, plumbing, mechanical, and electrical. These life systems are often overloaded when a commercial building becomes an industrial building, or a residential use becomes a home office in addition to the residential uses. Commercial and residential buildings both are subject to failure relatively easily when the use becomes storage, for example. The dead weight of paper, and furnishings, for example, as it collects in offices can easily exceed design load provisions. When this happens, a catastrophic loss can occur. We are reminded by these accidents in Harlem just how realistic these risks can be. Architects should be utilized by everyone all the time to identify structural problems in buildings over 10 years old. There is no reason that these buildings, bridges and infrastructure should not be mapped more thoroughly.
When gas is present in a building it is imperative to isolate the leak and shut it down. The longer a leak is allowed to vaporize, it’s explosive properties become exponential. The results as we saw yesterday in Harlem are indicative of how gas expands in closed spaces. Fire tests done by Fire Marshals in Pennsylvania proved just how dangerous gas leaks become over time. If you smell gas, evacuate the building.
The stage collapse in Anaheim, CA on 3/09/14 is another indication of an overloaded structural frame. Too many kids, and far too little education about loading limits. This is why schools and facilities everywhere should have an architect on staff for reviewing uses, and changes of building use. Far too many of these basic structural deflections are being overlooked due to the under-utilization of architects as a profession. Watch the stage collapse here: CA STAGE COLLAPSE Mr. Robert Sawyer is a California Licensed Architect and is available for TV, radio and print media interviews. Contact Kay Gumaer at (310) 699-8723. www.rsarch.org.

Whistleblowers now can file complaints online with OSHA:

Whistleblowers covered by one of 22 statutes administered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) now will be able to file complaints online. The online form will provide workers who have been retaliated against with an additional way to reach out for OSHA assistance online.

Currently, workers can submit complaints to OSHA by filing a written complaint or calling the agency’s (800) 321-OSHA (6742) number or an OSHA regional or area office. Workers now will be able to electronically submit a whistleblower complaint to OSHA by visiting www.osha.gov/whistleblower/WBComplaint.html.

“The ability of workers to speak out and exercise their rights without fear of retaliation provides the backbone for some of American workers’ most essential protections,” says Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health David Michaels. “Whistleblower laws protect not only workers but also the public at large, and now workers will have an additional avenue available to file a complaint with OSHA.”

The new online form prompts workers to include basic whistleblower complaint information so they can be contacted easily for follow-up. Complaints automatically are routed to the appropriate regional whistleblower investigators. In addition, the complaint form can be downloaded and submitted to the agency in hard-copy format by fax, mail or hand-delivery. The hard-copy version is identical to the electronic version and requests the same information necessary to initiate a whistleblower investigation.

Detailed information about employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets and instructions regarding how to submit the form in hard-copy format, is available online at www.whistleblowers.gov.

The London Fire Department reports an unknown number of casualties at this hour as survivors are being pulled from the Apollo Theatre structural collapse. Full story: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/balcony-collapses-apollo-theatre-central-london-article-1.1553139 Another report here: http://youtu.be/zIKfiH3HUvM

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Shawmut, an East Coast-based $850 million dollar national management construction firm responsible for LA flagship stores including Louis Vuitton, Yves Saint Laurent and Tory Burch on Rodeo Drive, has just expanded into an LA office in the mid-Wilshire area.

In addition to the firm’s newly established LA outpost, the team is currently under construction on a new ChristofleBarney’s and Santa Anita Park, as well as recently having recently completed culinary hotspots Nobu and Nikita in Malibu, and Del Frisco’s Grille in Santa Monica. Other notable national clients include Apple, Le Bernardin, The Waldorf Astoria, Harvard University and Yale University.

 

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SNOW KREILICH ARCHITECTS

ARCHITECTURE FOR ARCHITECTS

Phaidon Press launch Phaidon Atlas: Architecture for Architects (www.PhaidonAtlas.com), a global online resource for the best examples of contemporary architecture, spotlighting thousands of projects built in the 21st century.
The product of 6 years of extensive research and the input of over 200 architects, universities and experts from around the world, this new digital resource is designed to evolve as a growing online community to help build a global network for architects to communicate and share ideas, and will be a must-have research tool and an essential resource for anyone creating, studying, involved in, or passionate about the field of contemporary architecture.

 

Editor’s Note:

The architect’s* (builder’s also) nightmares are many, but we may refer to a few of them. There is the client who does not know much about building but who has friends who do, to whom he goes for suggestions — and, unfortunately, gets them! Were these suggestions made to the architect direct he could in most cases dispose of them; but his client becomes an intermediary, carrying back his defence or explanation in a garbled form to a judge who is prejudiced against him. The client often begins to feel that if he knew more about the game he could himself catch the architect out. Strained relations, inconsistent with lofty ideals of charity, supervene — and we have a case of architect’s nightmare (builder’s also!)

We have the client who, like the ancient Athenians, is always looking out for some new thing. His architect can do nothing without discussing the advantage of something he has not thought of adopting and is usually unsuitable and inappropriate. Yet, because the client and not the architect has mentioned it first, the client feels he has got his architect at a disadvantage, and the poor fellow is much in the position of a man who runs for a train with insufficient time and failing wind. This is another well-known form of nightmare.

The economical client is often a trial and discipline to those whom he employe. His architect can do nothing without being told of something some where else which was cheaper, and a continual stream of such reminders gradually destroys the architect’s peace of mind, leaving him in the posi tion of a convicted fool — an experience akin to a nightmare. The architect who builds for a client whose finances cannot well bear the strain naturally fares badly. He is placed in the position of a man who insists on his solicitor fighting a weak case. If by a miracle he wins, his judgment is justified; if not, it is human to attribute his failure to inefficient professional advice.

These and many other forms of nightmare might be described, but it suffices to say that one and all of them are obviously attributable to the client’s failure to digest and understand the true nature of the sympathetic and altruistic architect he has employed. Summing up the evidence we have briefly marshalled, we may say that architectural nightmares such as we see around us owe their origin not so much to the failure of architects, but to their super-abundant sympathy for their clients, while the architect’s nightmares have their origin in the failure of the client rightly to understand and estimate the full merits of the profession. The treatment in both cases is obviously not to administer remedies to the architect, but to the general public. We are refining pure gold at our numerous architectural schools, while what is needed is to leaven the mass and make the public recognize the talent which is theirs to employ. But touching the minor question of the education of the architectural student, we have indicated the nature of another aspect from which it may be approached.

We may arrive at a definition of virtue and vice by studying either, and is it not possible that in all fields of thought it is sometimes well to adjust our views by considering not only what is, but also what is not? We have often been asked to give chapter and verse for a condemnation of bad design, which we have found difficult precisely because we have never troubled to analyze the nature of what displeases us, while we find it easy to explain the merits of what we consider good. As the proper study of mankind is man and not good men alone, so our proper study is building and not good building alone, and it is only mental laziness which leads us to restrict the extent of our survey. We are but the instruments on which our clients play their harmonies or strike discords, and what is needed is that the performer should receive a training which will enable him to appreciate our manifold merits. – The Editor

Adopted from the classic reference text: ca. 1922 American Architect & Architecture C 373602 – Fornightly, New York

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